Star-Fired Beef

Steam Challenge – Analogue: A Hate Story

2 Comments

This is part of my Steam Challenge Series (the full list is here).

Time Played: 7 hours

This was an enthralling experience. Analogue: A Hate Story is an interactive visual novel that has you as an investigator trying to find out what happened to the people aboard a Korean colony ship that was recently discovered adrift in some remote part of human-controlled territory, after being thought lost centuries ago. Through interacting with the ship’s AI, you have to piece together the story and recover as much data as you can to bring home to your employer.

If you are after action or mind-bending puzzles here, you’re out of luck. You will be reading and clicking links to read some more, except for a single timed event about halfway through that requires you to add typing to your repertoire. The main story is drip-fed to you, and it will take several attempts to unlock it fully. There are 5 possible endings, I believe, and if you like this game at all, you’ll want to go back and see them all.

I loved it. This was my first visual novel experience, so I am now a definite convert to the genre. The story is bleak, drawing heavily on medieval Korean culture for inspiration. Women who play this are hereby warned: you will probably end up really pissed off at some point. That’s about as much I can say without giving away spoilers, as there isn’t much else to the game that I can talk about.

I’m definitely looking forward to playing the sequel.

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2 thoughts on “Steam Challenge – Analogue: A Hate Story

  1. I’ve had this one on my wishlist since I heard Maddy Myers talk about it on Isometric. I’m glad you liked it. I don’t think I’ve ever played a true interactive novel before, but games like The Walking Dead seem close enough to that. Plus, it’s in space, which automatically makes it cooler.

    • Yeah it’s a slightly different experience to something like the Walking Dead. Not only are there no cinematics, but in TWD the story is presented to you linearly, whereas A:AHS is more like a jigsaw puzzle, with hints and clues given from all these different perspectives. It’s kind of like a whodunnit, but instead of an “aha!” moment where the mystery is solved, there is just a series of decision points where you keep asking yourself, “how do I feel about this, morally?”.

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